About Chords...

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So, if we look at a Gmaj triad, we see it contains the notes G-B-D. On a stringed instrument that you would pluck, rather than use a bow, (E.G. Guitar, and in this specific case, a banjo.) what would adding in more of those same notes do? Because a banjo is tuned to g-D-G-B-D we have three different notes, (albeit in different octaves) because all the notes stay the same, is it still a triad? I could turn it into a Seventh Chord by adding in a Minor Seventh from the root G note, (If you look at the tuning, it would be the upper case G and not the lower case g.) while making that Gmaj triad Seventh chord is actually impossible unless you have hands the size of Andre the Giant, it is simply an example to ask the question. So, as a recap, is adding more of the same notes to a Gmaj triad changing the type of chord it is? Thanks in advance.

Triad Gmaj Banjo Minor Seventh g scale Strings instrument Seventh Chord

Mar 20, 2016

4 Answers

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Semantics ( ? ). 3 notes are a triad / 5 notes, of duplicated notes, may be considered a 'Chord. A "Triad' may be easier to convert into an 'Inversion, of its self. Whereas: a Chord, may be a more complicated process. The ' Full Voicing', is a matter of artistic choice, over the "implied" triad. Whatever works !

Oct 23, 2016
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Hi There,

As you suspect, adding more notes of the same name (but different octaves) to a chord will not change the chord as long as they are all still part of the original chord.

-Garrett

Mar 20, 2016
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Yes adding more of the same notes would not change the type of triad. If you do want to change the chord type, consider adding F to create a G7 chord, or adding F# to make a Gmaj7 chord. Hope it helps! Like us on www.facebook.com/allegrotheory :)

Mar 28, 2016
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Yes adding more of the same notes would not change the type of triad. If you do want to change the chord type, consider adding F to create a G7 chord, or adding F# to make a Gmaj7 chord. Hope it helps! Like us on www.facebook.com/allegrotheory :)

Mar 28, 2016

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